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“You like the cold.” This was an actual statement made to me on my recent trip up to Churchill, Canada. I was instantly incredulous. Only insane people like being cold. But I allowed the statement to sink in.

This was my second trip to the sub-arctic in as many years. Gasp! Who am I??

Juliana and Seamus Dever - Winter Arctic Wear

In which I convince hubs to go to Iceland on the coldest, darkest days of the year for “vacation.”

 

Okay fine, maybe they had a point, but there is a difference between being IN the cold and BEING cold. In repeatedly traveling to and playing in sub-arctic destinations, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to pack for winter adventures. As the adage about no bad weather goes, being cold is usually a result of inappropriate clothing.

 

To Check Baggage or Carry-on?

There are strong arguments on either side including additional checked baggage fees and the possibility of losing your luggage. Some people treat carrying on as proof of their traveling superiority, but whatever. Do what’s best for you.

Sub-Arctic luggage - Winter travel packing list

This was my final baggage count for my winter trek up to Manitoba. I also bring laptops, hard drives and camera gear for work, so my carry-on bags get heavy.

 

While I am a firm abider of the “every ounce counts” rule, I make baggage decisions based on the following factors:

 

CHECK

  • I’m heading somewhere with very few transfers
  • I’m staying somewhere with bell captains or my husband
  • My transportation is private or a car rental
  • I’m doing a big arctic trip and my clothes are bulkier
  • I’m already carrying on a backpack AND more camera gear than usual
  • I’m bringing wine (this happens more than you think. At least for me.)

 

CARRY-ON

  • I’m lugging my own bags to multiple destinations along the route
  • I’m using trains or other public transportation the whole trip
  • I’m heading somewhere warm and my clothes are light
  • I’m keeping my camera gear to a bare minimum
  • I have easy access to laundry machines and have the time to do it

 

If you’re reading this and thinking that I could still do a trip without checking bags, you’re right, of course I can. But sometimes I don’t want to wear the same three outfits or wash my underwear in the sink every fifth night.  Plus, I fly so much that I have free checked baggage. You pack your bags however you like, these are just my rough guidelines.

 

Tip: Packing cubes and compression bags are the key to everything. They are easily purchased online. I personally love my Flight 001 packing cubes. They are super durable and I’ve been using the same two cubes for the last five years and they’re still going strong.

 

Randy A Christmas Story

Randy is so old skool.

Layers: Bundle up without looking like the kid from Christmas Story

A major component to this one is the TYPE of fabric you layer. Cotton is no go. I don’t even bother with chunky sweaters or big loose pants. In fact, my long underwear is so thin, I can fit them under skinny jeans, so miracles can happen.

 

Tip: Go for wool. SmartWool is my go-to brand. They make sweaters, hats, socks (I LOVE their socks), base and mid layers, even dresses. Their wool is thin, keeps you warm, keeps you dry, and smells fresher longer.

 

Juliana Dever - Winter Travel Packing List

My indoor wear: fleece vest, slippers and a stuffed goat. Cozy.

For my long underwear, I have a heavyweight, snug pair from Obermeyer and a wildly thin yet super warm pair made of modal from Cuddl Duds. Likely you’re familiar with the big outdoor brands of North Face and Patagonia, so here are a few other brands to check out if you’re looking to add to your travel wardrobe: Prana, Royal Robbins, Columbia, UnderArmour, ExOfficio and REI.

 

Fleece is another cozy layer, but use sparingly as it’s on the bulkier side. I also have a puffy jacket that folds into itself to become a pillow. It’s my favorite thin layer and it keeps loads of heat in.

 

Winter Travel Packing List

Here’s what I pack for my near-arctic adventures. These items are more geared toward time spent dog sledding, glacier hiking, polar bear watching, etc. I do usually pack at least one or two outfits that can double as city wear when you’re in say, Reykjavik or Winnipeg, so I’ll note that as well.

*This is for a 7-10 day trip, so adjust according to your trip length and access to laundry facilities.

 

 

Base Layers – Everything Starts Here

Top

 

Bottom

  • 2 pairs of long underwear: 1 super thin for under jeans, 1 medium to heavy weight for under insulated pants
  • 4-5 pairs of wool socks: you’ll need both thin liner pairs and super thick heavy weight socks
  • 7 pairs of underwear

Juliana Dever dog sledding gear

I wear my shorter coat during activities, such as dog sledding, so I have more mobility.

Mid Layers

Top

  • 2 sweaters: try wool, they’re thinner, warmer and easier to pack
  • 1 medium weight pullover. I love my REI top – it has thumbholes and zips up to my neck.
  • 2-3 shirts for hanging at the lodge, a city day or travel

 

Bottom

  • 1-2 pairs of jeans
  • 1 pair of fleece pants (the warmest layer ever!)

 

Other

  • 1 set of pajamas
  • 1 swimsuit for hot tubbing or geothermal pools (pack in a plastic bag in case you need to transport while it’s damp)

 

Outerwear

Top

  • Juliana Dever arctic wear Inukshuk

    This heavy coat is from J. Peterman. I love it because it’s super warm, but filled with synthetic materials instead of down.

    1 heavy weight wool jacket or ultra-thin puffy jacket

  • 1 heavy weight ¾ or longer water-resistant, hooded insulated coat
  • 1 insulated ski-jacket (optional, depending on activities. I wear the bulkiest one on the flight and squash the other one flat in a compression bag.)

 

Bottom – I alternate between my insulated snow pants and the fleece + top layer combo

  • 1 pair of heavy weight insulated snow or ski pants/overalls
  • 1 pair of water-resistant, breathable, movable pants (these go over your fleece pants)
  • 1 pair of waterproof hurricane pants. These are looser and can go over your top layer of jeans or other pants in case of a surprise rain or snowstorm, or super windy conditions. They’re great to just have on hand.

 

 

Extremities

Juliana Dever gaiter zipper vest - Winter travel packing list

Beanie? Check. Gaiter? Check. Fleece vest? Yup. Girl – Where are your gloves??

Footwear

  • 1 pair of insulated waterproof boots (I personally love my Sorels)
  • 1 pair of rubber soled “city” boots – in case it’s icy in the city. I have a groovy pair of Jambu boots that are fashionable and warm that have grippy soles.
  • 1 pair of warm slippers with soles for around the lodge
  • 1 pair of flip flops  – these are great for the aforementioned hot tubbing, as well as shared showers.

Juliana Dever sunglasses in arctic

The daytime is doubly bright when it bounces off that snow, so bring your shades! (I treat mine with a spritz of defogger.)

Other

  • Sunglasses – snow blindness is real.
  • Foldable daypack. Something I never travel without. My current favorite is the Trim Fit Life backpack that zips into itself.

 

Do you have any other winter packing tips? Is there anything you won’t travel without?

Note: All brands mentioned in this post are my personal recommendations and have been tested/worn during my travels. I have not received any products in exchange for a mention, nor compensation for inclusion.

Travel Pinterest - Clever Dever Wherever

Going on wintry adventure? Here's what to pack, including a checklist!

 

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About the Author

Hi. I’m Juliana Dever and according to science I have some sort of "exploration" gene. Embracing this compulsion, I spend a lot of time hurtling around the planet in metal tubes experiencing other cultures and writing humorous essays about it. Enjoy.

7 Comments

  1. Karo / January 30, 2017 at 9:53 am /Reply

    It’s always about layers no matter where and when you go 🙂 Nice article!

  2. Juliana Dever / February 15, 2017 at 12:45 pm /Reply

    Thanks Karo – yup, you’re right. Layers are EVERYTHING! Glad you enjoyed the article. 👍🏼

  3. Ashlee / December 4, 2017 at 2:11 am /Reply

    Thanka for the article.

    Going to Yellowstone for Xmas and live in cali.

    Have a lot of essentials but wanted to ask what the warmest glove liner you would suggest and fleece mid weight?

    Thanks

    • Juliana Dever / December 8, 2017 at 10:17 am /Reply

      For gloves I would look for something that has a fleece lining and smartphone fingertips so you don’t have to take your gloves off to use your device. I have a pair by Dakine. I have several pairs of pants, two by REI and one by DC.

  4. Ashlee / December 4, 2017 at 2:23 am /Reply

    *Fleece mid weight pant

  5. Holly Titchen / December 7, 2017 at 9:47 am /Reply

    Great article. Thanks for these ideas. I have to travel back east in Dec. And I know it’s not Iceland these will help.
    Thanks

    • Juliana Dever / December 8, 2017 at 10:05 am /Reply

      Hey – cold is cold, especially for us Southern Californians! 🙂

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